How technology could help you live in your home for longer

Starts at 60:  For many of us as we get older, our wish is to remain living independently in our own home for as long as possible.  As we live longer and healthier lives, staying in your home for longer is becoming a more and more realistic goal.  With the help of technology, tens of thousands of Australians over-60 can expect to live independently in their home much later in life. Aged care and home care providers such as Feros Care are making investments in the sort of technology that will help you live in your home for as long as you can.  The technology, which includes smart home integration and wearable devices, is finding its way into the homes of more and more over-60s.   Feros Care’s LifeLink General Manager Anthony Bacon said assistive, smart technologies were improving the independence, safety and health of older Australians who want to live independently in their home for as long as possible.   Cont'd...

IU leads $1 million NSF-funded smart-home effort to advance health and independence in older adults

Indiana University Bloomington:  As part of a $1 million grant from the National Science Foundation, Indiana University has received over $670,000 to establish "HomeSHARE," the first networked system of smart homes designed to advance research on older adults. The funds from the NSF's Computing Research Infrastructure Program will support the installation of high-tech sensors and other equipment in the homes of 15 elderly volunteers throughout the city of Bloomington. The project is an effort to improve the quality of life of elders through the unobtrusive collection of high-quality research data. "As far as we're aware, this is the first large-scale research infrastructure project focused on smart homes," said Kay Connelly, an associate professor in the IU School of Informatics and Computing, who is the leader on the grant. "Typically, research infrastructure awards help maintain complex systems like supercomputers, or the purchase of advanced equipment. In this case, we’re looking to generate research data from people who enroll in a long-term study."   Cont'd...

Smart Home Trial Aimed At Improving Elder Care

Eoin Blackwell for Huffington Post:  Elderly Australians may soon have access to 'home smart' technology that can alert healthcare providers or family if they have taken a fall or not taken medication. The release of the breakthrough technology follows a joint trial by technology provider Samsung and Deakin University. Over the next few weeks, five homes in Geelong, Victoria, will be used to test a technology ecosystem specifically designed to help address challenges associated with in-home aged care. Using small, battery-powered sensors developed by Samsung, the Australian developed Holly Smart Home Project will be able to monitor aged care homes and can alert healthcare providers when strange activity is detected in or around the home. The sensors are placed around the house -- motions sensors, sensors under the bed for sleep tracking, door sensors, in cupboards, fridges, etc -- and stream information to a program named Holly, whose artificial intelligence coordinates the information to make certain predictions about your behaviour, said Rajesh Vasa, Professor of Software and Technology Innovation at Deakin University.   Cont'd...

Senior Lifestyle, A New Internet of Things Application

When the behavioral patterns are known, exceptions can be detected and analyzed. For instance, minor exceptions like skipping a meal or major ones like not getting out of bed in the morning, or even suspicious inactivity in the afternoon.

Scientists develop brainwave-scanning smart home system that's controlled with thoughts

By Kelly Hodgkins for DigitalTrends:  Eda Akman Aydin at Gazi University in Turkey wants to make it easier for people with movement disabilities to get around their home and has a novel idea. Her team is combining EEG (brainwave scanning) technology with current smart home products to create a thought-controlled home, reports New Scientist. It sounds like a script from a science fiction movie, but the technology to build a prototype thought control system is here, and researchers like Akman Aydin are working to develop it. Akman Aydin’s system uses an EEG cap that can detect a specific brain pattern, known as P300, that appears when a person intends to do something. The cap works in conjunction with a display that shows pictures of items, such as a TV or phone, which a person might want to use. When the person sees the image they want, the brain will send out a P300 wave that is detected by the EEG cap. This signal then can trigger the smart home appliance and be used to turn on the TV, prepare the phone to dial, and more.   Cont'd...

Protecode Announces Joint Open Source Software Competition with NHS

Competition to Identify Quality Software Projects within the Code4Health Custodian Model

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