Draper Introduces Fine Art for FlatScreens

New product from Draper conceals a flatscreen television with a stunning work of art and reveals it at the touch of a switch or wireless controller.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Terry Coffey
Phone: 765 -987 -7202, ext. 346
FAX: 765 -987 -7142
E -mail: tcoffey@draperinc.com
Web site: www.draperinc.com


Draper Introduces Fine Art for FlatScreens

(Spiceland, Ind.) - A leading provider of motorized projection screens, window coverings and projector lifts has introduced Fine Art for FlatScreens. The new product from Draper conceals a flatscreen television with a stunning work of art and reveals it at the touch of a switch or wireless controller.

Jacquard woven tapestries are available, as are custom woven PictureWeave™ tapestries from digital photographs. Logos can also be crafted into full -color tapestries.

For seamless integration into room decor, Fine Art for FlatScreens comes with a fascia that extends the tapestry up to 9" from the wall, and can be painted or finished to match the room. Wood fascia is also available.

Fine Art Tapestries are woven reproductions of original works of art, and will cover most flatscreen displays in sizes through 50" diagonal.

Draper's Fine Art for FlatScreens will be available for viewing in booth South 1 21663 during CES 2009, or visit www.draperinc.com/go/RevealConceal.htm.

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