Home Cabling Part V

So, now we've got a house full of cables, a nice wiring closet, and neat and impressive outlets. At this point you may be thinking 'what do I do with all these wires'? We should probably go over some of the things you can do with your new high-tech wiring system, and how to go about having all these technologies co-exist nicely.

Home Cabling Pt IV

Typically, crimp-on connectors are for stranded cable, and one of the biggest mistakes people make is using the wrong crimp-on end. If you look very closely, you will see a row of 'teeth' on the underside of the exposed pins. These teeth pierce the insulation of the cable to make electrical contact with the copper wire. Using a crimp-on connector designed for a solid cable on a stranded cable can result in an unreliable connection (and vice-versa).

Home Cabling Part III

Wiring outlets should not be placed in the same stud cavity as HVAC cold-air return ducts. Similarly, they should be at least one stud-cavity away from 120V/240V AC wiring. Ideally, all structured wiring should stay 12" from 120V wiring, and cross at right angles where necessary.

Home Cabling Part II

The wiring closet exists to hold not only the 'other end' of the cables we run to various points in the house, but also the devices like network hubs, PBXs, alarm control panels, video and audio distribution equipment, etc. that will provide the services these cables carry.

Home Cabling - Pt I

Home cabling systems are no different than commercial systems, they often contain a mix of broadband (coax) cables, and twisted pair cables carrying voice, data, and security signals. The components and connectors for these systems have been tried and proven in the commercial industry and there is no reason to reinvent them for the HCS industry.

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