Can A Smart Home Replace Security Guards and Video Camera Surveillance?

Craig Bretzlaff for IoT Evolution:  All homeowners are concerned about protecting their property against burglars and break-ins, especially those in the luxury market. Home automation is quickly becoming a reality, allowing individuals to control certain aspects of their home through the simple click of a button on an internet-connected device. Since security guards and video camera surveillance can significantly increase security overhead, smart homes can offer a way to lower those costs while still maintaining a keen eye on one’s property.

What is a smart home? A smart home is a home that is equipped with devices that can transmit data. These devices can control lights, electricity, and locking systems - which can be accessed remotely from an internet connected device, like a cellphone or tablet. The home automation market is predicted to grow, with experts putting its market value well over $10 billion by 2020 (Source). The ability for technology to integrate naturally within a home may seem strange now - like an amenity only applicable to multi-million dollar mansions -  but in a decade the IoT technology will likely become standard in many middle-class homes.  Cont'd...

Control4 is First to add Cloud-Based Management for Connected Homes to High-Performance Routers

Control4 Corporation, a leading global provider of connected home solutions, announces the release and immediate worldwide availability of BakPak on Pakedge RK-1 Routers. A first for the industry, the integration of the latest release of BakPak management software with the router enables Control4 dealers to offer more homeowners the benefits of a monitored, intelligent home network. 
BakPak proactively manages both the IP network and smart home devices, delivering real-time visibility of network health, allowing diagnostics and troubleshooting before problems happen to mitigate downtime, service calls, and unhappy customers. Now integrated with the ubiquitous network device, the router, Control4 is arming its dealers with a more robust tool to help them manage their customers' systems remotely.   Full Press Release:
 

IoT and Internal Big Data Protection

-Billions of connected devices, endless opportunities for data theft -Protecting data inside the corporate perimeter

Don't Get Smart with Me! But Your Home Can

UL is working with manufacturers to overcome challenges of interoperability, usability and cybersecurity.

Trend Micro and ASUS Team Up Again to Protect Home Users against IoT Security Threats

Joint home router solution keeps home IoT devices from malicious activities

This Small Device Detects Cyber Threats In Your Smart Home Devices

Jennifer Hicks for Forbes:  By 2025, IDC says that 80 billion devices will be connected to the internet. In the near future, Gartner predicts that by 2020 there will be approximately 25 billion IoT-enabled devices. If you need more proof of rapid consumer adoption in practical terms, Amazon Echo has sold 5.1 million smart speakers in just the first two years of being on the market. 

Now, let's look at the data from all this connectivity. Planet Technology gathered some Internet of Things (IoT) statistics and came up with an infographic that puts the upsurge in connectivity and the data it generates into perspective. If a byte of data was a gallon of water, today in 2016, it would only take 10 seconds to fill the average house with data. By 2020, it will only take two seconds. That's a lot of data being collected by your smart home devices from your intelligent fridge to your connected washing machine, baby monitor and thermostat.  Cont'd...

How to Protect Connected Home Devices and Appliances from Cyber Attacks

Security is a requirement for all consumer IoT devices, no matter how small or seemingly insignificant. By adding a few basic capabilities, the security of any device can be significantly increased.

Z-Wave smart-home gadgets announce new IoT security standards

Ry Crist for CNet:  Less than a month ago, hackers took control of an ocean of unsecured connected home devices, then essentially crashed the entire internet by using them to flood the web's largest internet management company with bogus traffic. Now, the makers of smart gadgets that communicate using Z-Wave are ratcheting up their security standards to help reassure consumers that their products don't come with glaring vulnerabilities.

"No one can afford to sit on their hands and wait," says Mitchell Klein, executive director of the Z-Wave Alliance. "Consumers deserve IoT devices in their home to have the strongest levels of security possible. IoT smart home technologies that don't act will be left behind."

The new standards are called the "Security 2" framework, or S2 for short. Aside from shoring up encryption standards for transmissions between sensors, cameras, and thermostats that broadcast using Z-Wave, S2 also mandates new pairing procedures for each device -- namely, unique PIN or QR codes on the devices themselves.  Cont'd...

Researchers' Belkin Home Automation Hacks Show IoT Risks

Mathew J. Schwartz for BankInfoSecurity:  As if the internet of things didn't seem secure enough, now we have to worry about apps on our smartphones posing a risk too.

That's just one of the takeaways from the discovery of two zero-day vulnerabilities and one hardware-bypass flaw - now patched - in Belkin's WeMo line of home automation products. The flaws, and how to exploit them, were demonstrated Nov. 4 at Black Hat Europe by two researchers from endpoint security software firm Invincea, in a presentation titled: Breaking Bhad: Abusing Belkin Home Automation Devices.

Belkin bills its WeMo apps as being "designed to address simple automation needs without the hassle or expense of whole home automation." Compatible products include everything from "smart" LED light bulbs, power switches and baby video monitors to coffeemakers, slow cookers and heating controls. In November 2015, Belkin reported that 2.5 million devices using their technology were in the market.  Cont'd...

Your smart home could help "bring the internet to its knees," expert says

Melanie Ehrenkranz for Tech.Mic:  Last week, a distributed denial of service attack took down Twitter, Reddit, Spotify and oh so much more. The hackers remain at large, but the root of the hack is clear: tens of millions of insecure IoT devices attacked by a massive botnet. 

"This could mean everything from camera systems, to power company self-reading meters, to smart lightbulbs," Radware vice president of security solutions Carl Herberger said in an email Monday. 

The devices that were vulnerable to hackers during last week's attack were mainly DVRs and security cameras, but any device connected to the internet is a potential target: lightbulbs, webcams, toasters, coffeemakers, thermostats, televisions, shower heads, connected locks — and the list goes on.   Cont'd...

Continued Growth of the "Internet of Me" Has 88 Percent of Consumers Considering the Risks of Using Connected Devices

National Cyber Security Awareness Month reminds all digital citizens to stay educated about cutting-edge technology and better protect against their associated threats

7 ways to keep your smart home from being hacked

Kari Paul for MarketWatch:  As the recent announcement that 500 million Yahoo email accounts were hacked shows, emails and passwords are never fully safe. On a daily basis, hackers use strategies like phishing scams to steal usernames and passwords, posing as a bank or other legitimate establishment to trick users. Consumers should be wary of any email asking for personal information and always check the sender address to be sure it’s based at the website the sender claims to be (like an @paypal.com email address versus a deceptively similar location like @paypal.co or @paypalhelp.com). No measure will guarantee users won’t be hacked (email addresses can even be spoofed, and there are ways to check for this by tracing IP addresses). But a number of actions can be taken to lower the risk of hacking and secure your home.  Cont'd...

Step Up Your Smart-Home Security Now

NATHAN OLIVAREZ-GILES for The Wall Street Journal:  Connected cameras and other smart-home devices promise a Jetsons-esque future. But as a recent hijacking of more than 100,000 networked cameras and DVRs demonstrates, they also provide fertile ground for hackers.

“You should make the assumption that anything that’s internet accessible is hackable. If it has a camera or a mic built in, it can be taken over,” said Kenneth White, a security researcher and director of the Open Crypto Audit Project, a nonprofit that promotes cybersecurity.

To protect yourself, you have to have the right perspective. “You need to take this seriously, but not be afraid of it either,” he said. Once you accept that hacking happens, embrace the security at your disposal. Here are some easy tips to help you step up your smart-home defenses:  Cont'd...

Will Hackers Outsmart the Smart Home? Why Security Needs to Happen at the Design Level

ABI Research:  The advent of home automation and rapid rise of smart home connected devices is seeing some vendors and new startups scramble to become a part of the movement, with ABI Research forecasting 360 million smart home device shipments by 2020. But many companies are leaving major security flaws in the wake of their hurried attempts to penetrate the market, producing products riddled with bugs and unpatched vulnerabilities. Ignoring cybersecurity at the design level provides a wide open door for malicious threat actors to exploit smart home products.

“We see an alarming increase in ransomware in smart TVs and IP cameras, code injection attacks, evidence of zero-day threats, and password eavesdropping for smart locks and connected devices,” says Dimitrios Pavlakis, Industry Analyst at ABI Research. “The current state of security in the smart home ecosystem is woefully inadequate. Smart home device vendors need to start implementing cybersecurity mechanisms at the design stage of their products.”

Numerous attack vectors have been identified in popular smart home communication protocols, such as ZigBee, Z-Wave, and Wi-Fi. Many companies are creating and selling easy-to-tamper smart locking systems, easy-to-hack sensor systems, and products that host a plethora of software vulnerabilities.  Cont'd...

MacKeeper Partners with CUJO to Protect Smart Homes from Cyber Threats

As part of their partnership, MacKeeper's parent company, Kromtech Alliance Corp., and CUJO signed a reseller deal under which MacKeeper will distribute CUJO devices among their customers starting in July 2016.

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