Gizmodo, Why 3D Will Never Ever Work

So why will 3D content never take off? It's not the silly glasses or the lack of content. It's not even that we all kinda hate it. According to Academy Award-winning editor Walter Murch: it's evolution, baby. Murch, writing to renowned film critic (and prominent 3D antagonist) Roger Ebert, says that 3D's primary failure is our own eyeballs. Specifically, how millions of years of human development have taught them to focus: The biggest problem with 3D, though, is the "convergence/focus" issue. A couple of the other issues - darkness and "smallness" - are at least theoretically solvable. But the deeper problem is that the audience must focus their eyes at the plane of the screen - say it is 80 feet away. This is constant no matter what. But their eyes must converge at perhaps 10 feet away, then 60 feet, then 120 feet, and so on, depending on what the illusion is. So 3D films require us to focus at one distance and converge at another. And 600 million years of evolution has never presented this problem before. All living things with eyes have always focussed and converged at the same point.

TiVo refocusing on Web video and on-demand services

TiVo, the pioneering digital video recorder, is beloved by couch potatoes for offering a simple way to record television shows for watching later. But the company's hot-and-cold relationships with cable providers is complicating the fate of TiVo's digital recording and video-on-demand services. TiVo's subscriber base peaked in 2006 and has been declining since, according to TV by the Numbers, an industry news blog. TiVo's response to this slump has been two-pronged. For one, the company has scrambled to sign deals with TV service providers. TiVo announced one such milestone agreement with UK cable giant Virgin Media, in which TiVo will be the platform developer.

GE demonstrates home technologies at International Builders Show

Universal Remotes: Not Remotely Possible

THE universal remote control is one of the modern world's great ideas, right up there with the automatic dishwasher, Wi-Fi and flush toilets. The theory behind this gadget is simple and sublime: In an increasingly automated and connected world, wouldn't it be wonderful if we could manage all our blinking machines from a single super controller? I wish I could tell you that there is a better way. But after testing many different universal remotes - cheap remotes, expensive remotes, smartphone remotes, and a few about which the less said, the better - I don't have much good news to report. Sure, some universal remotes are more useful than others, and one of them is almost pretty good, but in general these devices remain more appealing in theory than in practice. That's because they all suffer from an inherent, usually fatal flaw: universal remotes cannot possibly offer enough buttons to mimic all functions of all devices, so they usually have to make compromises, cutting out buttons here and there. The trouble is, some of those buttons are important.

App Downloads top 2 million on Samsung TV's

Samsung is seeing significant growth in app downloads on its line of HDTVs. The company announced this week that 2 million apps have been downloaded from its sets since its marketplace launched last year. The news comes less than two months after Samsung announced that 1 million apps had been downloaded from its service. The feat is all the more impressive when one considers it took 268 days to hit the 1 million mark. YouTube and Hulu Plus are among the most commonly downloaded apps, according to Samsung. They are joined by ESPN's Next Level, AccuWeather, and Google Maps. The company's marketplace also offers Blockbuster, Twitter, Pandora, and several other applications. When it announced 1 million downloads late last year, Samsung said that more than half of its 2010 line of HDTVs featured the ability to access apps. Samsung said at the time that it believed retailers would sell 6.5 million sets featuring apps by the end of 2010. And it expected that figure to jump to 20 million by 2012.

DEVELOPMENTS IN ADJACENT SECTORS OPEN OPPORTUNITIES FOR HOME AUTOMATION TO REACH A WIDER AUDIENCE

Home automation systems are becoming increasingly simpler for both end users and installers, driving the market forward and acquiring a wider audience. Technology advances also help create innovative and affordable systems that reach a more extensive customer base. New analysis from Frost & Sullivan, European Home Automation Markets, finds that the market earned revenues of €164.3 million in 2010 and estimates this to reach €228.7 million in 2015, at a compound annual growth rate of 5.1 per cent. 'Home automation has witnessed major changes over the recent years; the most significant has been the introduction of tablet computers which are having a major impact on the home automation market, particularly the luxury segment,' states Frost & Sullivan Research Analyst Hammam Ahmed. 'So far the market has satisfactorily addressed the new developments and is set to benefit from these advances in a manner that will promote home automation and make it available to a wider customer base.'

Developments in Adjacent Sectors Open Opportunities for Home Automation to Reach a Wider Audience

Home automation systems are becoming increasingly simpler for both end users and installers, driving the market forward and acquiring a wider audience.

Greensound Technology

Greensound Technology unveils the world's first wireless, high-fidelity glass speakers using patented "Greensound" innovation.

Parks Associates to present new consumer research at Smart Energy Summit Workshop, including panel discussion with Austin Energy, TXU, Motorola Mobility, and Ingersoll Rand

IBM, Grid Net, U.S. Department of Commerce to keynote three-day Summit next week in Austin

Women in CE Honor Five Outstanding Women at the 2011 Legacy Awards Reception During International CES

Gary Shapiro, President and CEO of the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA), Addressed the Crowd on How to Continue Fueling the Growth of the CE Business

DVI over Cat5 Solutions From Tripp Lite

Extend DVI signals up to 200 feet with Cat5 Solutions from Tripp Lite

Niles to Showcase new DS Directed Soundfield Ceiling -Mount Loudspeakers at ISE 2011

Designed to complement high end interior design, new easy to install ceiling mount loudspeakers offer unobtrusive aesthetics and superior sound performance

D -TOOLS SI5.5 SP3 UPGRADE NOW AVAILABLE

Latest Service Pack of award-winning software makes it easier than ever to design, estimate, and document integration of low voltage systems

Hands-only Remote Control Emerges in Taiwan

A Taipei university team has developed a tiny chip that allows remote control over home appliances with no more than a wave of the hand and features that make it faster, cheaper and more resistant to interference than rival inventions, the professor in charge said on Tuesday. Users of the chip developed by the National Taipei University of Technology's graduate automation institute can switch on televisions, home stereos and air conditioners by hand from two meters away, Professor Chen Wen-hui said. They can adjust volumes or change settings the same way, he said. The graduate institute is applying for a patent to sell what it believes to be a "significantly faster" device-less remote control system that what other research institutions have developed, Chen said. It will also cost less, though Chen said prices had not been set. Signals should be top of the line, he said, given that "what people fear the most is interference."

Boxee may go to subsidized deals to compete with AppleTV

Boxee may turn to subsidies to help get the price down and better compete in the market, company founder Avner Ronen said in an episode of the This Week in Startups show recorded on Friday. He mentioned that the $200 street price for a Boxee Box was "way too expensive" to get mass market adoption and floated the idea as one option for future models. Nothing was definite in the talk and might not necessarily come about with a future deal. Ronen also provided some brief hints at the possible future of Boxee. Gaming was a possibility as he noted that games had often driven technology adoption, but it would most likely occur through the browser in HTML rather than through proprietary apps. A TV tuner had been ruled out in at least the short term as it was a matter of "focus and resources."

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Automation & Control - Featured Product

Light sockets; Not just for lights anymore

Light sockets; Not just for lights anymore

Smart Bulbs are out there and they can do far more then just provide light. Speakers, projectors, wi-fi extenders and more. The standard light socket that is wired up and ready to go in nearly every home in North America is now providing an easy and affordable option for home owners and renters alike to enter into the world of the "Smart Home". Here is a look at some of the Smart Bulbs and Smart Lighting options out there, and this list is just the beginning. In this ongoing article we hope to continue to add to and grow this list, so stay tuned!