CRESTRON DIGITALMEDIA™ CERTIFICATION NOW ACCREDITED BY INFOCOMM AND CEDIA

Crestron Designer and Engineer Certification Programs Now Qualify for InfoComm RU and CEDIA CEU Credits

Crestron DMC -D and DMC -E certification classes are now fully accredited for continuing education units by the InfoComm AV professional Certified Technology Specialist (CTS®) and CEDIA Certification programs. Digital is much more complex and unpredictable than analog, and Crestron wrote the HD Digital Transport and Distribution System (HD -DTDS) Specification to address this dramatic change. The HD -DTDS is a definitive design, installation and commissioning guide that guarantees the reliable performance of digital AV systems. Crestron DM Designer and Engineer Certification programs ensure that AV professionals are fully educated and adhere to the standard. Introduced a year ago, Crestron DigitalMedia™ was developed to meet the challenges of the digital era; it has since become an industry standard.


"As an industry, we have a responsibility to the client. Crestron has invested tremendous resources - time and expense - to develop the technology and products to meet the new challenges of the digital era," explains Vincent Bruno, Crestron Director of Marketing. "InfoComm and CEDIA have now joined us to ensure that our industry partners are properly educated and certified to deliver reliable digital systems."

Crestron conducts DMC -D and DMC -E classes throughout North America. The HD -DTDS specification and corresponding coursework sets a high benchmark for digital AV systems and gives clients the confidence that our industry remains a trusted and valued technology resource. InfoComm grants 3.5 RU credits to the DMC -D and 10.5 to the DMC -E. The DMC -D earns 2 CEDIA CEUs while the DMC -E earns 8.

A DM -certified designer understands the fundamental differences between analog and digital systems and the unique design considerations needed to ensure reliable operation. The DMC -D class is a one day course that concludes with an exam that must be passed to earn certification.

The three -day DMC -E Certification program details every aspect of system installation and commissioning, and encompasses the DMC -D certification plus additional hands -on lab work. Two written exams plus a practicum must be passed to earn certification. DM -certified engineers demonstrate proficiency in system setup, diagnostics, testing and reporting. Only a DMC -E is equipped to fully execute and support a DM project. Written into the specification, only dealers with a DMC -E on staff will be qualified to bid on projects designed using the HD -DTDS.

Specifiers using the DM HD -DTDS specification guarantee their customers that the design will be finalized by a DMC -E, ensuring proper system installation, configuration of HDCP, video, resolution management, cabling and cabling distance. Additionally, Crestron guarantees and fully supports any DM system installation that conforms to the HD -DTDS standards.

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PureLink - HCE III TX/RX: 4K HDR over HDBaseT Extension System w/ Control and Bi-Directional PoE

PureLink - HCE III TX/RX: 4K HDR over HDBaseT Extension System w/ Control and Bi-Directional PoE

The HCE III Tx/Rx HDBaseT™ extension system offers full HDMI 2.0 compliance supporting HDR (High Dynamic Range) and 4K@60Hz with 4:4:4 chroma sampling. Featuring PureLink's proprietary Prcis codec, a light compression technology, the HCE III can transport Ultra HD/4K, multi-channel audio, and High Dynamic Range (10 bits support) content over a single CATx cable. The HCE III provides HDMI extension up to 130 feet (40 meters) at Ultra HD/4K and up to 230 ft. (70 meters) at 1080p over category cable with embedded multi-channel audio, CEC pass-through, bi-directional RS-232 and IR control, and PoE - all with zero loss and zero noise. The HCE III Tx/Rx also supports Dolby TrueHD, Dolby Digital Plus and DTS-HD Master Audio plus LCPM (up to 192 kHz). Additionally, the low profile "slim box" enclosure design make the HCE III ideal for limited space installation environments, such as behind flat panel displays and video walls.