Sunlight Readable LCDs can be Used Directly under Sunlight!?

Certain applications require placing the LCD display outdoor or even under direct sunlight. However, will the LCD be readable under direct sunlight and stand the heat at the same time?

Certain applications require placing the LCD display outdoor or even under direct sunlight. Since LCD brightness typically rates about 500nit, it requires higher brightness to be viewable under direct sunlight. Currently, there are two ways to improve the brightness:


1. Increase backlight brightness to at least 1500nits
2. Change LCD to transflective type which uses the reflective sunlight source to enhance the LCD contrast and brightness

The two methods described above can both accomplish great results, however, the heat endurance level of the liquid crystals are very low thus the problem is still unsolved. Typically, liquid crystals will start making white spots on the display when temperature exceeds 55 degree Celsius. Some manufacturers will solve the overheating issue with cooling fans or air conditioners. However, these can only alleviate hot air flow, but the radioactive heat from direct sunlight still exists. Display will still turn to white screens even with a little exposure from the sun. I personally suggest that direct sunlight must be avoid when using out -door LCD, however, if it's unavoidable then cooling methods such as air -conditioning must be provided, however it will be costly and definitely not eco -friendly.

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