Once the Neurio Sensor is installed on an electrical panel, it sends the data via WiFi to the secure cloud where the smart algorithms identify the unique power pattern by each device in real-time to tell whether a specific appliance is in use or off, and how much energy it consumes.

Smart Home Interview - Neurio

Contributed by | Neurio

Neurio is an intelligent, open platform that can, with only one sensor, bring smart home capabilities to the whole home and the existing appliances. Neurio acts as the “brain of the home” and can connect to both older devices and new connected devices. Now homeowners can better understand how their home is operating, such as letting the user know when their kids come home, or if they forgot to turn something off before leaving for the day. More details and video demos can be found at www.neur.io

Which technologies do your products use to communicate with each other and how does it work?

Once the Neurio Sensor is installed on an electrical panel, it sends the data via WiFi to the secure cloud where the smart algorithms identify the unique power pattern by each device in real-time to tell whether a specific appliance is in use or off, and how much energy it consumes.  This information is then sent in real-time to the homeowners smartphone via the Neurio Android or iOS app.

Do your products communicate with products from other manufacturers using a standard protocol? (which one)

Neurio is designed as an open platform to work hand-in-hand with other smart home products.  Neurio makes other smart devices even smarter by providing real-time data and analysis about the home. These integrations right now are planned at the cloud level so we don’t have to worry about an lack of protocol compatibility.

Also through Neurio’s open API and integrations with 3rd party applications such as IFTTT and Spark, Neurio is encouraging developers, makers and hackers to create their own experiences with Neurio, ultimately providing consumers with an incredibly robust and beneficial platform.

What types of devices do you manufacture or provide?

 

  • Hubs
  • Network Devices
  • Software / Apps
  • HVAC / Energy Management Devices
  • Other 
    Neurio is a bit unique in this regard as we act as the hub of the home, provide software and app for user interface, do energy management and also make non-connected device, connected.

Can your products be installed by the homeowner or are special skills and tools required?

Most of our users choose to install the Neurio Sensor themselves. It usually takes about 15-20 minutes and it’s completely reversible as you don’t have to cut any wires. However, if you not comfortable around electricity, we highly recommend you have an electrician install it.  

In a short paragraph or 2 please describe how your products fit into a Smart Home scenario and how they are set up to work together to perform automated tasks.

Neurio is an intelligent, open platform that with only one sensor brings smart home capabilities to the entire home, with future versions providing intelligence for all existing appliances.  As the “brain of the home,” Neurio connects both older appliances and newer “smart” devices to allow users to easily track, monitor and better understand how their home is operating, such as letting the user know when their kids come home, or if they forgot to turn something off before leaving for the day.

Neurio makes it simple, affordable and practical to bring smart home technology, and its benefits, to the masses.

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Comments (1)

Wi-Fi has evolved considerably since I competed with the standard as marketing chairman of the HomeRF Working Group and wrote the Wireless column for HomeToys, and this evolution is setting up a new standards battle pitting Wi-Fi against Z-Wave and Zigbee. Designers can exploit mesh networking, for example, to overcome range issues of using less transmit power to extend battery life, but will that allow IoT devices to run for a year or more on tiny batteries, as with Zigbee? Possibly, but while it depends on the application, I surely understand the advantages of the evolving Wi-Fi ecosystem and think this article did a great job of explaining that. There are important lessons from the market decline of HomeRF that may also apply to Z-Wave and Zigbee. At its peak in 2000 when I was chairman, HomeRF represented 95% of the wireless home networking market, and most analysts viewed HomeRF as technically superior to 802.11. Its adaptive frequency hopping technology contributed to security advantages over 802.11 WEP encryption, as well as better interference immunity and QOS capabilities designed to carry voice, data and streaming audio & video simultaneously. HomeRF also had a huge cost advantage over 802.11, at least initially. It was the first to hit the magic $100 consumer price point when 802.11b NICs sold for $250 and access points went for over $1,500. Apple's AirPort was the first 802.11 product to meet that $100 target, but it was soon followed by many others due to the wide availability of chipset from several suppliers. So with these and other advantages, why did HomeRF eventually lose out to Wi-Fi in the market? There were many reasons, but you can get that insight by searching Google for “HomeRF Archives”.

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