HomeToys.com is approaching its 14 year anniversary. A virtual internet dinosaur, HomeToys published its completely online magazine for the first time on October 1, 1996, and since that time we have published thousands of articles, interviews, reviews and more.

We thought it would be fun to look back and see how we did. We will take a look at some of the early technologies we reviewed, predictions our writers made and all and all just take a trip down Home Technologies memory lane.

HomeToys.com Retro - TIVO

Brandon Hetherington | HomeToys

July 2010

HomeToys.com Retro - TIVO
A fun look back at 14 years of articles, interviews and reporting on the Home Technology Industry.

Author: Brandon Hetherington, HomeToys

aHomeToys.com is approaching its 14 year anniversary. A virtual internet dinosaur, HomeToys published its completely online magazine for the first time on October 1, 1996, and since that time we have published thousands of articles, interviews, reviews and more. Here's a link to that first issue.

We thought it would be fun to look back and see how we did. We will take a look at some of the early technologies we reviewed, predictions our writers made and all and all just take a trip down Home Technologies memory lane.

 

TIVO

Back in the summer of 2000 I was lucky enough to get my hands on a TiVo. Like all 1st run technologies it had its problems but the idea was solid and TiVo opened the door for the DVR (digital video recorder) which is now common place in most homes in North America. There was even a period of time where the word “TiVoing” was used in lieu of “recording”. We don’t hear as much about TiVo these days as the majority of the DVR’s in peoples homes are leased out from their cable or satellite provider. A look at their website shows me they have new systems that are incorporating some of the new features consumers are now demanding such as movie and internet streaming and compatibility with mobile devices, all at a price that is affordable to the mass markets. So it appears 10 years later TiVo continues to innovate and competetive.

Looking back at this review I was remembering how slow the TiVo changed channels, it seemed to take 3 seconds in-between channels, a huge frustration for a flipper like myself. My current DVR is somewhat faster, but this is still a frustration for me. I also recalled how I had to run a telephone line to the TiVo so that each evening it could call into your subscription service and get an updated programming list, I guess this made the TiVo one of the first connected home theater devices . To this day my friends will bring up how I had one of those original TiVo’s and they remember watching the World Series at my house and how we were able to “pause” and “rewind” live television.

If I remember correctly TiVo’s original marketing tag line claimed they would “change the way you watch television”; and they did. Now, whether or not they really profited as much as they should from it I don’t know, but bottom line, the TiVo was one cool device back in 2000. Original Tivo review.


Comments (0)

This post does not have any comments. Be the first to leave a comment below.


Post A Comment

You must be logged in before you can post a comment. Login now.

Featured Product

PureLink - HCE III TX/RX: 4K HDR over HDBaseT Extension System w/ Control and Bi-Directional PoE

PureLink - HCE III TX/RX: 4K HDR over HDBaseT Extension System w/ Control and Bi-Directional PoE

The HCE III Tx/Rx HDBaseT™ extension system offers full HDMI 2.0 compliance supporting HDR (High Dynamic Range) and 4K@60Hz with 4:4:4 chroma sampling. Featuring PureLink's proprietary Pr©cis codec, a light compression technology, the HCE III can transport Ultra HD/4K, multi-channel audio, and High Dynamic Range (10 bits support) content over a single CATx cable. The HCE III provides HDMI extension up to 130 feet (40 meters) at Ultra HD/4K and up to 230 ft. (70 meters) at 1080p over category cable with embedded multi-channel audio, CEC pass-through, bi-directional RS-232 and IR control, and PoE - all with zero loss and zero noise. The HCE III Tx/Rx also supports Dolby TrueHD, Dolby Digital Plus and DTS-HD Master Audio plus LCPM (up to 192 kHz). Additionally, the low profile "slim box" enclosure design make the HCE III ideal for limited space installation environments, such as behind flat panel displays and video walls.