One would have to be living on a deserted island somewhere not to have seen the effects digital photography and printing have had on this century old industry which has been profitable even through the toughest of depressions and recessions.

Photoplus Expo 2005

James Russo

Photoplus Expo 2005:
The Old and New of Photography

By James Russo

One would have to be living on a deserted island somewhere not to have seen the effects digital photography and printing have had on this century old industry which has been profitable even through the toughest of depressions and recessions.


The Photoplus Expo 2005 took place at Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York City from October 20-22 2005. The show has changed dramatically in the few years that the show has been held at Javits here in NYC which reflects the tremendous upheavals that have occurred in the still photographic area. One would have to be living on a deserted island somewhere not to have seen the effects digital photography and printing have had on this century old industry which has been profitable even through the toughest of depressions and recessions.

Who would think that Kodak, a veritable titan in the photography industry, would be teetering near bankruptcy due to the advent of digital photography. Other big names both foreign domestic such as Fujiflm and Nikon would also have to make the move to digital in order to stay afloat in these turbulent economic times. However, the Photoplus Expo really know no technical boundaries and both modern digital and traditional photography are given even room and even respect on this show's expo floor.

One New York city photography heavyweight, B&H Photo-Video-Pro Audio always has a big booth at the Photoplus Expo and 2005 was not exception. This huge, warehouse size photo store has dominated the Manhattan market on anything and everything photographic whether it be digital, traditional, and everything in between. B&H features in their store a complete line of photographic equipment including digital still camera, traditional 35mm film still cameras, lenses, filters, lights, camcorders, digital printers, and a complete line of photographic supplies for both the professional and the novice.

As always at these trade shows, free industry magazines were everywhere you looked. However, one booklet given out which was very interesting was the APRS Handbook 2004/5. The APRS book is the handbook of the Association of Professional Recording Services and features a number of articles about CD's and DVD's. One article of interest is "The Rose of the music DVD" by Rob Pinnger. The article is one of the first detailed articles this reviewer has seen regarding the DVD mastering process. The article covers in depth how films are remastered for DVD release, how extras are put on the DVD's, and how the main menu's are created as well as the scene selection.

Related links:

www.photoplusexpo.com
www.bhphotovideo.com
www.aprs.co.uk 


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