These ideas will allow the installer to provide for the installation of an unlimited numbers of doorjamb controlled lighting arrangements.

Installing A Doorjamb Light Switch

| Clear Lighting and Electrical Design

Installing A Doorjamb Light Switch
Clear Lighting and Electrical Design

These ideas will allow the installer to provide for the installation of an unlimited numbers of doorjamb controlled lighting arrangements.


Following are the suggested devices, and installation instructions, for a low voltage (24 Volts AC) doorjamb switch that will operate any desired 120 Volt lighting when the door is opened.

NOTES:

  1. Installation requirements may vary. The Contractor is ultimately responsible for proper installation, operation, and compliance with all applicable Building Codes.
  2. All vendor-specific information provided in this document is for illustrative purposes only. The electrical designer, engineer, or contractor is responsible for specifying the appropriate materials to meet clients' requirements, as well as all Building Code requirements.

Part 1 - Doorjamb Switch

Below is the Edwards Signal #44 switch that Clear Lighting and Electrical Design has specified for over ten years. Here is the link to review the details regarding this switch: http://www.edwards-signals.com/index.cfm?pg=3&level=48&pid=69&tab=0 

  • Fast installation
  • Low voltage

The Catalog 44 rolling ball contactors are insulated, rugged devices that operate from pressure in any direction. Installation requires no mortise.

For use on doors, windows, transoms, burglar alarms, machinery. Shown in actual size.

Following are the installation instructions for the doorjamb switch shown on the previous page.
 

Step 1. Drill a 1-1/2 inch hole in the doorjamb framing. Select a location that:
A. Will not interfere with the door hinges.
B. There is adequate space behind the doorjamb framing to allow for some movement of the wire as the carpenter installs the doorjamb.

Step 2. The doorjamb switch is installed on the surface of the doorjamb itself with the body of the switch recessed into the doorjamb stock. To install the switch, drill a 7/8-inch hole in the doorjamb at the same elevation the 1-1/2 inch hole was drilled in the doorjamb framing. Insert the body of the doorjamb switch into the 7/8-inch hole and secure it with the two screws furnished with the switch.

Step 3. Install 18-2 thermostat wire from the selected doorjamb frame location to the relay location discussed in Part 2.

Step 4. Attach the thermostat wire to the two terminals on the doorjamb switch.

Step 5. The doorjamb can now be installed. Use caution not to pinch, cut, or crimp the switch or wire as the doorjamb is set in place, squared, and secured.

Part 2 - 120 Volt Relay Installations

There are several possible arrangements for installing the 120-VAC relay, or relays, that will operate the light fixture, or fixtures.

Option 1. A single doorjamb switch will operate a single relay that will operate a single light fixture, group of light fixtures, or single circuit of light fixtures.

Option 2. Multiple doorjamb switches will operate a single relay that will operate a single light fixture, group of light fixtures, or a single circuit of light fixtures.

Option 3. Multiple doorjamb switches will independently operate multiple light fixtures, groups of light fixtures, or multiple circuits of light fixtures.

Option 1 Installation

This arrangement is for a single doorjamb switch utilized to operate a single light fixture, group of fixtures, or a single light fixture circuit.

Following is a photo of a common relay used for this arrangement.

The example shown above is Grainger Part #: 1N182. The details regarding this relay, and other similar relays can be seen here

NOTE: This relay emits a loud clicking sound when activated. Therefore, if the installation location is a noise sensitive location, such as a master bedroom closet, then the relay may need to be installed outside of the sound sensitive area, such as in an attic.

Following are the installation instructions for the relay, or equivalent, shown above.

Step 1. Install a 4-inch square junction box in the location where the relay will be installed.

Step 2. Mount the relay assembly on the surface of the 4" square junction box.

Step 3. Attach the thermostat wire from the previously installed doorjamb switch to the designated low voltage terminals, or pigtails (depending on the specific relay used).

Step 4. Attach the black (hot) line and load leads to the designated terminals, or pigtails (depending on the specific relay used).

Step 5. Test the circuit operation by opening and closing the door in which the doorjamb switch was installed.

Option 2 Installation

This arrangement is for multiple doorjamb switches utilized to operate a single light fixture, group of light fixtures, or a single light fixture circuit.

Step 1. Install a 4-inch square junction box in the location where the relay will be installed.

Step 2. Mount the relay assembly described in "Option 1 Installation" on the surface of the 4" square junction box.

Step 3. Attach all of the thermostat wires from the previously installed doorjamb switches in parallel to the designated low voltage terminals, or pigtails (depending on the specific relay used).

NOTE: Depending on the number of doorjamb switches, it may be appropriate to connect all doorjamb switch leads separate from the relay, and use a pigtail to attach to the relay low voltage terminals, or pigtails (depending on the specific relay used).

Step 4. Attach the black (hot) line and load leads to the designated terminals, or pigtails (depending on the specific relay used).

Step 5. Test the circuit operation by opening and closing each of the doors in which the doorjamb switch was installed.

Option 3 Installation

This arrangement is for multiple doorjamb switches utilized to independently operate multiple light fixtures, groups of fixtures, or multiple light fixture circuits.

When there is a need for multiple doorjamb switches that will independently operate multiple light fixtures, groups of fixtures, or multiple light fixture circuits, it is not cost effective to use a large number of the relay used for option 1 or 2 installations.

If required to use the relay described for option 1 or 2 installations, and to improve efficiency of installation and maintenance, the relays can be grouped in a mechanical location, crawl space, other suitable space.

However, the preferred, most cost-effective, option for controlling multiple lighting fixtures, groups of light fixtures, or multiple light fixture circuits, is to install an arrangement as described below.

The materials needed for this type of installation are:

1. A single 120/24v. 40va. Transformer - This transformer will be used to supply the relay coil operating voltage for all of the required relays. A single line voltage feed is required, and the low voltage leads are connected to all relay coils in the arrangement.

The example shown here is Grainger Part #: 3TZ67. The details regarding this transformer, and other similar transformers can be seen here

2. Appropriate length of DIN mounting track - The length of track is dependant on the number of control relays required. Multiple tracks can be employed to separate relays by area, location served, or other design parameters.

The example shown above is Grainger Part #: 6X295. The details regarding this mounting track can be seen here.

3. A DIN rail mounted relay socket - The relay sockets can be pre-deployed to speed the addition of new locations and doorjamb switches. Relay sockets can be grouped by area, location served, or other design parameters.

The example shown here is Grainger Part #: 4DG59. The details regarding this relay socket, and other relay sockets, can be seen here.

4. Relay, 10 amp DPDT contacts with a 24-VAC coil - The relay will be installed in the above socket to perform the actual switching an and off of the light fixtures, groups of fixtures, or light fixture circuits.

The example shown above is Grainger Part #: 2W929. The details regarding this relay, and other similar relays can be seen here

5. An appropriately sized junction box to house the required number of transformers, sockets, and relays for the planned installation.

The above items when installed using appropriate electrical installation methodology, and in a typical distribution location, will allow the installer to provide for the installation of an unlimited numbers of doorjamb controlled lighting arrangements.

Below are two photos of door jam switches for closet light fixtures. Using one of these switches will automatically turn the closet fixture on when the door is opened and off when the door is closed.

This is a very simple automation operation that has been around for many decades. There is a choice of which type of jam switch to use as reviewed below.

Option One - This is a line voltage switch that is difficult to install for the electrician and the trim carpenter. Damage to the wood door jamb may occur as shown below. These switches have been around for years and are three times larger that option two.

Option Two - This is a much easier and cleaner installation for the carpenter. Many clients prefer this installation to lessen the chance of damaging the wood door jam. Additional installation information is available for this option two from Clear Lighting and Electrical Design.

If you need assistance with the design and/or specifications for your installation, please contact Clear Lighting and Electrical Design at your convenience. We look forward to supporting your project requirements.


Comments (0)

This post does not have any comments. Be the first to leave a comment below.


Post A Comment

You must be logged in before you can post a comment. Login now.

Featured Product

Art Diffusor® Model D by Acoustics First

Art Diffusor® Model D by Acoustics First

The ArtDiffusor® Model D (patent applied for) is the newest in the ArtDiffusor® Series. The Model D is an organic, quadratic diffuser; fusing diverse design concepts such as MLS, QRD, bicubic interpolation and boolean logic mapping. These rolling, asymmetric diffusers minimize specular acoustic reflections while improving sound clarity and ambience. Their design encourages developing customized patterns, allowing for a truly unique installation - every time.