The National Electrical Code requires that AFCIs be used to protect circuits in residential bedrooms for all new construction. The same protection can be gained in older homes by having them installed on some, or all, of your home's circuits.

Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupters Bringing Safety and Technology Together

| Eaton Electrical

Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupters
Bringing Safety and Technology Together

The National Electrical Code requires that AFCIs be used to protect circuits in residential bedrooms for all new construction. The same protection can be gained in older homes by having them installed on some, or all, of your home's circuits.


For more information on Cutler-Hammer Fire-Guard Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters, please visit www.EatonElectrical.com .


Could you imagine not having a smoke detector in your home? When smoke detectors were first introduced, it was mandatory to have one in every home. Today, it is mandatory to have one on every floor. Smoke detectors have helped alert millions of families of fires and have saved lives.

Imagine a new technology that could alert you before a fire even started... that could prevent a fire. Arc fault circuit interrupters can do just that. Arc-fault circuit interrupters (AFCIs) protect against a type of electrical fault that circuit breakers and fuses can't guard against very well. One example would be a frayed lamp cord that exposes some of the copper wire inside, which then creates a low-energy electrical arc with a nearby piece of grounded metal. Another would be a dangerously loose electrical connection. Either of these situations can result in "arcing faults" (electricity traveling short distances through the air) that may not create overloads of sufficient magnitude to trip a circuit breaker or blow a fuse. However, even low-energy arcs have the ability to ignite flammable materials such as paper or curtains.

This technology was driven by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC) goal of finding a way to reduce residential fires through new technologies. Several years ago, a CPSC study identified arc fault detection as the most promising new technology.

Engineers at Eaton Corporation were the first to employ the AFCI technology and filed for a patent in 1991. Six years later Eaton released the Cutler-Hammer Fire-Guard Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter, the first of its kind on the market. Since that time, Eaton has remained in the forefront of AFCI technology.

According to the CPSC "You may want to consider adding AFCI protection for both new and existing homes. Older homes with ordinary circuit breakers especially may benefit from the added protection against the arcing faults that can occur in aging wiring systems. "

The National Electrical Code requires that AFCIs be used to protect circuits in residential bedrooms for all new construction. The same protection can be gained in older homes by having them installed on some, or all, of your home's circuits. AFCIs can be purchased at most Home Improvement centers, Electrical Distributors or through an Electrical Contractor.


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